Volume 185

North East Industrial Steam (60-mins) Price £19.75

**RELEASED JUNE 2014**

Many of the great names associated with the birth railway are also associated with the North East of the country. Such names at Stephenson and Hackworth spring to mind. In this volume we cover many of the locations still using steam in this area and these famous names continue as those of the locomotive builders.

At the NCB Philadelphia central workshops we see the remains of a Hackworth locomotive, built for the Hetton Colliery Railway as far back as 1838. Many of the other locomotives seen in use come from the factory in Forth Street, Newcastle built where George and his son Robert Stephenson set up their original works in 1823.

In Northumberland, we start at Ashington, the “largest pit village in the world” and see coal being moved from the pit to the power station.

Moving south to County Durham, we see locomotives built by the pre-grouping North Eastern Railway still being used on BR tracks.

Other locations visited include the shipbuilders Doxfords, with their fascinating fleet of crane tanks. Many NCB locations are also visited including Derwenthaugh, Morrison Busty, Hetton, Lambton, Backworth, Burradon, Bates, Widdrington, Amble, Whittle, Shilbottle, and Harton with its electric locos.

Onwards to the Durham coast and we visit Seaham Harbour with its second-hand locos and the famous steam paddle tugs “Eppleton Hall” and “Reliant” in action.

Apart from the Hetton Colliery locomotive, the other locomotives seen date from one built in 1887 to the Stephenson Iong-boilered design and the modern Hunslets of 1957.

We have a ride in the cab along a colliery mineral railway and also see the colliers being loaded from coal staithes at the coastal ports. A veritable feast of steam in the North East with a flavour of industrial history!

All the archive film used is virtually all in colour and an extensively researched commentary along with an authentic soundtrack has been added.

Cover Photo:- Jon Marsh
Lambton No.29 climbing the bank to Philadelphia.

Click here to order this Volume 185 and other videos online

(By clicking here you are entering Wolverton Rail Videos web site with over 4000 transport videos & DVDs available

‘Run by Enthusiasts for Enthusiasts since 1987′.

Please note you will be buying from Wolverton Rail and not B & R Video Productions)Read More

Released in Industrial Railways, Volumes 180-189 | Tagged , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Volume 177

Industrial Steam in the South East (60-mins) Price £19.75

**RELEASED JUNE 2013**

In this volume, we cover the industrial railways in the South East of England including London. After steam had finished on the main lines, this area still had steam workings at the various industrial sites and for enthusiasts it was the place to visit until the mid 1970s.

We start with a visit to London’s Acton Lane Power Station and saddle tanks “Birkenhead” and “Little Barford” in action complete with wasp stripes on their smokeboxes! At Slough Estates complex, Hudswell Clarke tanks are shunting oil wagons. Mind the cars, there’s just a gap!

In 1972, we visit Rye House power station near Hoddesdon on the ex-GER main line to see RSH tank No.7597 shunting (more wasp stripes!) before witnessing its transport by road (mind those 25kv wires) for preservation on the Stour Valley Railway. Later, we see it in action on the SVR and on the GCR at Loughborough.

Onwards and there are Peckett saddle tanks at Ipswich Sugar factory and at Ford’s Dagenham Works (it had 25 miles of lines), where we see a variety of scenes including the foundry and dockyard.

Next to Chatham Dockyard and a 1980s view of the derelict saddle tanks followed by later preservation scenes with restored “Ajax”. Then to the paper mills at Greenhithe and Gravesend for fireless locos in action in & around the works.

Sittingbourne’s Bowaters Paper Mill had the largest system for paper and we make an extensive visit to it’s narrow gauge railway with mostly pre-preservation views of steam in action on goods as well as passenger trains. Plus views of standard gauge ex-SECR P “Pioneer II”, saddle tank “Jubilee”, the cableway and the dockside.

Onto Swanscombe Cement Works & Quarry in 1968 for Hudswell-Clarke tanks busy shunting cement wagons and then to Snodland Cement Works to see “Hornpipe” in action plus steam at Holborough Quarry with “Tumulus”.

Finally we visit the Kent Coalfield and the collieries at Snowdown and Betteshanger for extensive steam activity with “J94 type” Hunslets (among others), more wasp stripes, loading & unloading of wagons and a Class 73 electro-diesel at the BR exchange sidings.

All the archive film used is virtually all in colour and an extensively researched commentary along with an authentic soundtrack has been added.

All the archive film used is virtually all in colour and an extensively researched commentary along with an authentic soundtrack has been added.

Cover photo: Colin White”Monarch” at Bowaters in 1969.

Click here to order this Volume 177 and other videos online

(By clicking here you are entering Wolverton Rail Videos web site with over 4000 transport videos & DVDs available

‘Run by Enthusiasts for Enthusiasts since 1987′.

Please note you will be buying from Wolverton Rail and not B & R Video Productions)Read More

Released in Industrial Railways, Volumes 174-179 | Tagged , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Volume 166

Industrial Steam Part 2 (79-mins) Price £19.75

**NOW IN STOCK JANUARY 2012**

With the plethora of main line and branch line steam film footage from the 1960s, the co-existing but equally fascinating industrial steam scene in Britain is often neglected. It is easy to forget that it continued until around 1980. Although we have featured some scenes of industrial steam in other volumes, our last dedicated volume to Industrial Steam was way back in 1997 with our Volume 52! Here we have further look at industrial steam at work in England and Scotland from 1960 to 1980, this time mostly featuring the larger locomotives which worked at collieries and iron stone mines. These locomotives were usually built by private builders, although some ex-BR tank classes were used. The North East and Midland areas are well covered and there are many scenes of long gone engines working in an industrial environment now often vanished. Many of these engines survived into the preservation era and were eventually saved from oblivion. It is only fitting that we conclude our video with 2011 views of a selection of these industrial locomotives at work on preserved lines such as the Tanfield, Foxfield and Blaenavon railways.

All the footage is in colour and the film has an extensively researched commentary with an authentic sound track.

Keith Pirt/Courtesy Booklaw Publications, A Hawthorn-Leslie tank shunting at Nunnery Colliery, Sheffield, 1956.

Click here to order this and other videos online

(By clicking here you are entering Wolverton Rail Videos web site with over 4000 transport videos & DVDs available

‘Run by Enthusiasts for Enthusiasts since 1987′.

Please note you will be buying from Wolverton Rail and not B & R Video Productions)Read More

Released in Industrial Railways, Volumes 158-166 | Tagged , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Volume 147

Steam in the Valleys Part 2 (60-mins) Price £19.75

The valleys of Wales once supplied coal to the world. In the late 1960s and early 1970s, some collieries were still shunted by steam locomotives.
Here in our second volume featuring these collieries, we portray steam at MAERDY, MERTHYR VALE, ELLIOT, TY MAWR, CYM, MARINE, BENYON BLAINA, CELYNON NORTH, CELYNON SOUTH, HAFODYRYNYS, TAL Y WAIN, BLAENAVON and TREDEGAR.

We see examples of industrial locomotives from five different builders as well as ex-GWR tanks, 9600, 9792 and 7754, in all weather conditions from sun to winter snow.

Horse worked mines are also visited. These used narrow gauge track and at DARRAN open cast site we see horse traction being used before the arrival of steam.

Both steam and diesel BR motive power served the valleys and we record the various comings and goings of coal trains.

All filmed in colour by enthusiasts who found these industrial locations both fascinating and friendly after the demise of BR steam in the valleys of Wales.

Cover Photo:- Colin White, “Tudor” at Beynon Colliery, 4/6/70.

Click Here for Vol.135 – Steam in The Valleys Part 1

Click here to order this and other videos online

(By clicking here you are entering Wolverton Rail Videos web site with over 4000 transport videos & DVDs available

‘Run by Enthusiasts for Enthusiasts since 1987′.

Please note you will be buying from Wolverton Rail and not B & R Video Productions)Read More

Released in Industrial Railways, Volumes 142-149 | Tagged , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Volume 135

Steam in The Valleys (South Wales Industrial) Part 1 (60-mins) Price £19.75

Some steam lived on in the Welsh Valleys at least ten years after its demise on British Railways.

Starting with some Western Region steam in South Wales and a visit to the scrapyards of Cashmores and Woodhams, there follows a number of visits to industrial steam sites, mainly collieries. These are BRYNLLIW, GRAIG MERTHYR, MAESTEG, PARK TREORCHY, WERN TAWR and MOUNTAIN ASH. A visit is also made to the steel works at LLANELLY.

The industrial locations ranged from the scenic to typical industrial. Hard working engines are seen, some of them now preserved today, including ex-GWR 7754 and 9642.

Cover Photo:- Colin White, 9792 at Maerdy Colliery, 1970.

Click Here for Vol.147 – Steam in The Valleys Part 2

Click here to order this and other videos online

(By clicking here you are entering Wolverton Rail Videos web site with over 4000 transport videos & DVDs available

‘Run by Enthusiasts for Enthusiasts since 1987′.

Please note you will be buying from Wolverton Rail and not B & R Video Productions)Read More

Released in Industrial Railways, Volumes 134-141 | Tagged , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Volume 52

Industrial Steam (60 mins) Price £19.75

The popular misconception that Industrial railways were just yard shunts with small 0-4-0 tanks or the ubiquitous J94 type will be completely dispelled by this programme. Some systems were enormous like Ashington, Philadelphia and Corby, often fully signalled as well. There were ex BR steam engines to be found from all of the “big four” companies sold into industrial service. There were narrow gauge systems as well at Bowaters, Kettering and in North Wales. Ironstone systems could boast nearly 100 engines. Engines wrestling with poor track abounded at cement works while ports such as Preston, Whitehaven and Falmouth were locations providing steam locomotives at work. Par had one of the smallest and Baddesley Colliery had a Garratt at the other extreme. Fire-less engines found favour with paper manufacturers. The oldest engine in service could be found at Seaham, with Wirksworth a close second. Sentinels lived at Burton Latimer and Whifflett. Crane tanks at Doxford’s and Stanton & Staveley. Even a sewage plant found use for steam. Power stations had side tanks the power of a Black 5, the NCB probably had the biggest fleet of all. These are not posed views of steam but engines working hard for their living in their true environment.There are 100 engines from 25 builders in this story. It was all part of the steam scene in Britain, if you saw them, here are the memories; if not see what you missed.

Click here to order this and other videos online

(By clicking here you are entering Wolverton Rail Videos web site with over 4000 transport videos & DVDs available

‘Run by Enthusiasts for Enthusiasts since 1987′.

Please note you will be buying from Wolverton Rail and not B & R Video Productions)Read More

Released in Industrial Railways, Volumes 50-59 | Tagged , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment